Things That Seem Incredible

In the spirit of school starting in little over a week, here are some free talks for the medieval/early-modern history fans out there, especially those interested in the body, food, illness, punishment, and so on. (I’ve also thrown in one lecture on early medieval Latin song with my dear M. in mind.)
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Carnival Glitter, a Boy Scout, and the Dragon’s Tail: Civilian Radioactive Incidents

For the last couple of days I’ve been reading about small strange incidents regarding exposure to radioactivity, especially non-military events, or the lesser-known stories on the periphery of larger disasters. It’s utterly fascinating stuff, regardless of your position on the development of nuclear technology.

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Out of the Snow, Our Eyes Defiant

(The following is the final in a series of five poems I am posting from The New Russian Poets: 1953 to 1966: An Anthology, selected, edited, and translated by George Reavey. I am also including my original photography with the posts.
This is the second poem by Bella Akhmadulina. For more information on this poet, see the previous post
.
I dedicate today’s post to my husband.)

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Fifteen Boys

(The following is the fourth in a series of five poems I am posting from The New Russian Poets: 1953 to 1966: An Anthology, selected, edited, and translated by George Reavey. I am also including my original photography with the posts.
This is a very early poem by Bella Akhmadulina, a highly regarded and award-winning poet of the Russian New Wave. While her writing subjects and style were often described as “apolitical,” she was known to speak out against the Soviet establishment.

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But As For You, With What Are You Pregnant?

The following is the third in a series of five poems I am posting from The New Russian Poets: 1953 to 1966: An Anthology, selected, edited, and translated by George Reavey. I am also including my original photography with the posts.
This is a poem by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, a man with a story nearly as complex as the 20th century Russian politics in which he was entwined. As New York Sun journalist Michael Weiss wrote of the poet in 2008,

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I, He Says, Am No Warrior

(The following is the second in a series of five poems I am posting from The New Russian Poets: 1953 to 1966: An Anthology, selected, edited, and translated by George Reavey. I am also including my original photography with the posts.
This is an early poem by Novella Matveyeva, written well before she had established herself as an award-winning poet, screenwriter, literary theorist, and Russian
bard, which in this context refers to one who wrote songs with styles and topics outside the Soviet status quo. Matveyeva died in 2016.)

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Horses in the Ocean

(The following is the first in a series of five poems I am posting from The New Russian Poets: 1953 to 1966: An Anthology, selected, edited, and translated by George Reavey. I am also including my original photography with the posts.

Continue reading “Horses in the Ocean”

“The traditional commonplace scandalizes modern man. The most subversive book in our time would be a compendium of proverbs.”

For the last few days I have been perusing a website dedicated to posting English translations of the aphorisms of Colombian philosopher Nicolás Gómez Dávila (aka “Don Colacho”).

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The Pest Maiden: Precious

Here is one more poem from The Pest Maiden. See the first post about Penelope Scambly Schott’s book of poetry about lobotomy, family histories, how those histories echo through our own lives, and much more here.

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The Pest Maiden: Rehearsal

The final project in my American Literature class involves health and history. I’m writing about lobotomy, and have chosen to re-read The Pest Maiden by Penelope Scambly Schott and choose one poem to focus on.

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